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+4 votes
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In the novel Jeanne was the first one to approach her father; he had been taken away for so long,out of everyone she was the first one to approach him because she missed him. While Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki addresses Japanese American internment, it is truly a love story between father and daughter. “That’s how she remembered him before he disappeared. He was not a great man. He wasn't even a very successful man” (Wakatsuki 56) But he was very humble and tried to do his best for his family. “She didn't know what she was getting myself into. Years later she silently thanked him for forcing her  to postpone such a decision until she was older enough to think for herself.” ( Wakatsuki 104) We all think that we know better “especially teens' ' parents tried  their best to teach their children not to take the path that they did when they were young like them. Jeanne says that her father was not a great man but that he held on to his self-respect and dreams, and whatever he did, he did with flourish. 

Jeanne believes that her father's decision not to let  her be baptized was unfair, at the same time papa's decision was right because it enabled her to maintain some of her original identity. At the time, cultural assimilation for Japanese living in America was essential. The Japanese who lived in America were like Jeanne's father, people without a country.  Papa does not share their pride and wants Jeanne to become more Japanese. His housing project has failed, and Jeanne has lost respect for him because they are still in the cramped apartment where they must eat in shifts. This is truly a love story between father and daughter. In Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Jeanne and her family are sent to an internment camp in Manzanar after the attacks on Pearl Harbor. Her father, Papa, suffers very much from the discrimination against his family. We see him portrayed as a dignified man who is very scared. Moreover, through his daughter Jeanne's eyes, Papa is described as a strong man who has endured a lot of hardships in life. Papa is also painted as the family's patriarch, which causes a rift in the family when he is moved to a different internment camp, leaving his family without a decision-maker. 

The memoir, which is written from Jeanne's perspective, pays a lot of attention to Papa, which stems from Jeanne's close relationship with her father before they were placed in the internment camps. When she first describes her father, we see him as a strong, proud man. She says, ''About all he had left at this point was his tremendous dignity. He was tall for a Japanese man, nearly six feet, lean and hard and healthy-skinned from the sea. Ten children and a lot of hard luck had worn him down, had worn away most of the arrogance he came to this country with. But he still had dignity, and he would not let those deputies push him out the door. He led them.''  He is a natural leader, even though many events in his life have taken a lot from his character. We know that he used to be arrogant but hardships have taken that away from him. The family unit is very important, but it is pushed to the limit when Papa is taken to a different camp because he isn't an American citizen. When he leaves, the family isn't sure they can hold it together without him. Jeanne writes, ''Papa had been the patriarch. He had always decided everything in the family. With him gone, my brothers, like councilors in the absence of a chief, worried about what should be done.'' From this statement, it's clear that Papa has always made the choices for everybody. Jeanne's brothers struggle to take a leading role to keep the family afloat until they can be reunited with their father. Eventually, Jeanne's father is allowed to return to the same camp as his family. However, his return doesn't have a positive impact on the family. When he gets back, people think he might be spying on them for the government, so he becomes ''a total shut-in'', and blames Mama for all of his problems. 

According to Jeanne, Papa stayed at home and paced, alone a great deal of the time, and  Mama had to bring his meals from the mess hall. Throughout the book, we see all of Papa's flaws such as beating his wife and drinking too much, but a lot of that is overshadowed by the way Jeanne describes him as a man who refuses to be completely broken. She describes him as a man who can do anything he tries to do, regardless of the barriers against him in America. Even though Papa didn't do everything he wanted when he came to America, “ he had held onto his self-respect, he dreamed grand dreams, and he could work well at any task he turned his hand to: he could raise vegetables, sail a boat, plead a case in small claims court, sing Japanese poems.” (Wakatsuki chapter 5-7)  Love story is not all about two people falling in love with each other. There are times that love can be unbreakable, father and daughter have a unique bond between each other.  There are so many things a father's love gives and so many things that a lack of it destroys. I believe that God gives us the greatest example of a father's love. His love is sacrificial, patient, kind, humble, honest, forgiving, faithful, and selfless. It is constant and unchanging. Loving fathers who provide praise, support, and unconditional love give their daughters the gift of confidence and high self-esteem. 

Love is a strong word, there are no words to describe the love between Jeanne and her father. Papa only wants what is best for Jeanne, he also stopped her from getting baptized due to the fact that Jeanne was too young and Papa didn't want Jeanne to be baptized because then “he knew she would have to marry a Catholic and there was no such thing as a Catholic Japanese boy. Papa stopping Jeanne from getting baptized Jeanne lost respect toward her father and she became angry at him. Later on she silently thanked him. Love is very special, Jeanne and her father have a special bond together. Papa provides praise, support, and unconditional love for Jeanne, to give his  daughters the gift of confidence and high self-esteem. 


in Education by (4,840 points)

2 Answers

+1 vote

Well all I can say is u did a great job on ur essay. There is nothing to correct cause its all correct. 

by (600 points)
0 votes

“She didn't know what she was getting myself into. Years later she silently thanked him for forcing her  to postpone such a decision until she was older enough to think for herself.” (Wakatsuki 104)

There seems to be a problem with this quote. Check the text again. "Myself" doesn't fit, and if it is a quote from the text, it should have the proper agreement. ("Myself" would be "herself.") On the other hand, if you're taking her first person narration and incorporating it into your essay as you write about her and what she wrote in the third person, then you need to make a small change to the quote. You will need to use what are called "square brackets" when you alter a quote to fit into your paper. Don't use parentheses for this; be sure to use square brackets.

I don't have the text in front of me, but I'm guessing the actual quote from the book is "I didn't know what I was getting myself into." If that's the case, when you re-work the quote to fit your paper, here's how to properly alter the text using square brackets:

"[She] didn't know what [she] was getting [herself] into." The square brackets are permissible when they don't really change the meaning of a quote or if they are used around explanatory material. Let's say that Wakatsuki referred to the internment camp in this sentence: "We found it to be intolerable in some ways but tolerable in others." You could use square brackets as follows in your paper:

Wakatsuki spoke of both the good and the bad, writing "We found it [the internment camp] to be intolerable in some ways but tolerable in others" (122). <I made up the quote and the page number.> Three things to notice about this sentence:

(1) use of square brackets to enclose explanatory material; (2) incorporating the author's name into the exposition means you don't have to repeat it in the parenthetical citation--all you need to do is to cite the page number; (3) placing a period at the end of the citation, outside of the parenthesis. I noticed that in your paper, you did not include the ending punctuation after your citations. Example: you wrote "...a very successful man” (Wakatsuki 56) But he was..." You should insert a period after the parenthesis after the page number. It would be (Wakatsuki 56). <--- period here

Be sure to proofread your writing carefully. You wrote "...until she was older enough to think for herself." I think you meant "old enough." Also, move the period after herself and put it after the citation: ... for herself" (Wakatsuki 104). <-- put the period here

You also have a run-on sentence here: Jeanne believes that her father's decision not to let  her be baptized was unfair, at the same time papa's decision was right because it enabled her to maintain some of her original identity. You need to replace the comma after "unfair" with a period and capitalize "at" to start the next sentence. This kind of run-on sentence is called a "comma splice."

he would not let those deputies push him out the door. He led them.'' <--citation here

in the absence of a chief, worried about what should be done.'' <-- citation here

Be sure to cite all the rest of the quotes from the book as well.

Finally... and most importantly... you have represented someone else's writing as your own writing in at least one part of your paper.  When you take another person's words or ideas and present them in your paper without citing that information (or without using quotes when the material is taken directly from someone else's writing, it is called plagiarism, which you already know about.  Go back through your paper, and if there are parts where you copied and pasted or paraphrased information you found elsewhere, be sure to cite that information.  If *I* were your teacher, I would hand this paper back to you and ask you to re-submit it with proper citations.  If you were to tell me, "What citations?  I cited everything I was supposed to and didn't copy anything from someone else," I would not give you a passing grade. I would tell you, "You had your chance but didn't make the necessary corrections."

Benjamin Watson, in "Making Sure My Kids Know a Father's Love."  Sound familiar?  It should.  Here's what he wrote as part of his article:

"There are so many things a father's love gives and so many things that a lack of it destroys.  I believe that God gives us the greatest example of a father's love.  His love is sacrificial, patient, kind, humble, honest, forgiving, faithful, and selfless.  It is constant and unchanging."

Sound familiar now?  Cite it or delete it (and any other sections of your paper where you did the same thing.)

Best wishes with your re-write.

by (848,800 points)
+2

Thanks for correcting my errors. BTW “She didn't know what she was getting myself into." I know I had an error there, so before u told me I have already correct it. I appreciate ur help. Thanks Tamamatua JK

Ia manuia lou aso!!

0

Leia, I'm glad you corrected the "myself" error, and I hope you will address the more serious problem of the plagiarized material in your paper.  The rest of the comments I gave you are small potatoes compared to that one.  Please make the proper citations so that your paper will pass muster. 

Best wishes.  And... I had a nice day today. Thanks!

P.S.  I am a grandfather, and I'm proud of my 8 grandchildren.  The oldest one is in boot camp at Parris Island on his way to becoming a United States Marine.  Be well!

0

 The oldest one is in boot camp at Parris Island on his way to becoming a United States Marine. .. WOW! thts impressive 

Congrats grandpa, I'm glad to hear tht ur day was good.

How was ur thanksgiving btw?

Mines was terrible!

Fa Soifua

0

I'm sorry, too (fa) that your Thanksgiving was not what you wanted it to be.

Ours was good.  We had most of our family with us for dinner, but the whole family managed to get together later in the day for some celebratory time (except for the Marine recruit).  

We put up the Christmas tree, packed up the car, and took off for a week at Hilton Head.  Life is good.  :-)

Be well, Leia.   ma ia lelei  

0

Tht sound so fun!

Sounds like you had fun with your family, enjoy every single moment with them. 

Well Xmas is coming up lol

Whts ur plan for Xmas so far?


BTW (fa means bye) but to say (Fa) in a respectful way to the elder added ( soifua to it) so instead of u saying (fa) its fa soifua in more respectful way.


Take it easy.

God Blessed

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