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0 votes
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There exists a lot of criticism against critical race theory, however there are those that also believe in the importance of the movement in the modern world.

in Education by (100 points)

3 Answers

+3 votes

It depends on what you mean by "Critical Race Theory."  IF you accept the definition put forward by the conservative right, then there is no place for it.  If you know what it actually means, then of course it should be a part of all aspects of life, whether that life is in the United States or in any other country.  Here is a rather good explanation of CRT:

"Critical race theory is an academic concept that is more than 40 years old. The core idea is that race is a social construct, and that racism is not merely the product of individual bias or prejudice, but also something embedded in legal systems and policies.

"The basic tenets of critical race theory, or CRT, emerged out of a framework for legal analysis in the late 1970s and early 1980s created by legal scholars Derrick Bell, Kimberlé Crenshaw, and Richard Delgado, among others.

"A good example is when, in the 1930s, government officials literally drew lines around areas deemed poor financial risks, often explicitly due to the racial composition of inhabitants. Banks subsequently refused to offer mortgages to Black people in those areas." 

 For more information, see this link: https://www.edweek.org/leadership/what-is-critical-race-theory-and-why-is-it-under-attack/2021/05

There may be no simple definition, and whatever definition is selected will probably cause great controversy.  However, I believe it would be a good start to the discussion to ask they question, "Should the role of race and racism be honestly discussed?"  

I am reminded of a perfect example of "sweeping it under the rug" from a textbook used in my ROTC classes (Reserve Officer Training Corps). The textbook, produced by the U.S. Army for us, summarized the relationship between the military and the indigenous people of the American West: "...as the brave men in blue tamed the savage redskin..."  While such blatant racism probably no longer appears in textbooks (I certainly HOPE it does not), it is emblematic of the continuing problem we face in "telling the story."  (History, it is said, is written by the victors.)  In that ROTC course, it was never mentioned that the native peoples were given blankets that had been used by smallpox patients, and as a result, entire tribes were wiped out.  It never mentioned that they were forced from their lands to less-than-desirable areas (that has less water, less fertile ground, less animal life for hunting, etc.).  It never mentioned that when something was discovered on the reservations that the "settlers" wanted, the promises were broken and the land was taken away from them.  "Critical Race Theory," had it been in force during my time in ROTC, would have taken a more honest, a more straightforward approach to telling the true history of what happened during the "taming of the west" and would have laid out the current inequities that the tribes face.  Just one example.

The political and legal decisions that have been made over the years that have affected various minority populations must be included in our understanding of the present in order for us to have the ability to created a more equitable future.



by (848,800 points)
0 votes

Yes!

by (969,390 points)
+1 vote

It has a place everywhere due to how it breaks down the systemic exclusion of persons based on race and how that relates to societal hierarchies as a whole. Apparently a lot of Republican-led states in the South don't believe in that.

by (1,207,790 points)
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