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+1 vote
89 views
in Daily Life by (58,260 points)

4 Answers

+2 votes

I was the newspaper sponsor for a high school paper.  We had established our publication as an "Open Forum," which means all the rights of regular newspapers apply in terms of reporting.  In other words, the kids were allowed to print the news and their opinions, so long as everything was verified and supported and clearly labeled as either news or opinion.

The kids wrote an editorial mocking the athletic director's decision to ban all signs and shakers, etc., from the upcoming basketball games unless they got prior approval from his office.  The kids on the paper wrote an editorial which quoted the AD's whining earlier in the season about how little support the basketball team was getting and how school spirit was at an all-time low, etc.  Then the kids at the school came to the games with signs, shakers, and cheers they had worked on to support the team, etc.  The coach spent from his own pocket a couple of hundred dollars to offer free pizza to kids who dressed in school colors, had face paint, and a sign or shaker.  Needless to say, the attendance and school spirit rocketed up.  But there was such intensity at the games that the opposing team's crowd went into "competition mode" and things got very loud.  This made our AD very nervous, so he decided he'd better get a handle on it before someone took it too far.  So he instituted the wet blanket of pre-approval for the signs, etc.  THAT didn't go over well at all.

I was called into the principal's office to meet with the AD and the principal over the newspaper's editorial..  The AD told me I was irresponsible for letting the kids publish it, but I pushed back and told him it was THEIR newspaper, and if he wished to submit a letter to the paper laying out his justification for the policy, we would be happy to print it.  He didn't want to "lower himself" to writing to a student newspaper, so he refused.  I told him if he didn't take part in the process, he couldn't expect the results he wanted.

He tried to bully me, but I pointed out the "Open Forum" aspect of the paper and informed him that he was powerless to stop the kids from printing the paper so long as they stayed within the bounds of good journalism, and I was the arbiter of that, not him.

His face turned purple with rage, and he raised his voice.  He told me that if there were any problems at the upcoming games, "The blood will be on YOUR hands!  YOU have to be responsible for this!"  Finally, desperate for a closing accusation that would scald me to the quick, the sputtered and blustered and finally came out with:  "You, you, you... you LIBERAL, YOU!!!!"  The bell rang, andI quickly excused myself from the meeting to go to my class.  I turned away and could barely suppress a smile and laugh before I got to the hallway.  Talk about being saved by the bell.  I almost literally laughed in his face, but fortunately was able to suppress it.  He and I were friends, and I didn't want to embarrass him any more than he had been.

by (906,480 points)
0

I take it there ended up being no extensive rioting or bloody brawls at the game?

+1

You take it correctly.

+2 votes

"Helen is straight down the line, doesn't mess about even when she is wrong"!!!!

Ftom a colleague 

by (3,116,600 points)
+1

Very nice. 

+1

Really? I font think so  lol

+1

It was a sarcastic "very nice", lol.....apologies for not clarifying.

+1 vote

I don't know about complimentary insults, but I've sure been insulted by some people's 'compliments'...

by (79,390 points)
0

Now I'm curious. What compliment did you find insulting?

+1

Oh boy, well I'm terrible with memory recall, but the two that came to mind initially were along the lines of:

"You look so good! You look like you've lost a ton of weight!" When I had not lost any weight. I get that it was a compliment, but they made it sound like I looked bad before.

"You're the last person I picture being happy in a relationship and having a family, you're just so independent I feel like you'd much rather be completely on your own." Granted, this was said to me as a teenager, and now I would not find it nearly as insulting. But it definitely came off as a backhanded compliment like they were telling me that I seem like a total loner.

But, I am really independent, haha.

+1

Truthful insults are the worst.  How dare they know us, lol. 

+1

Hahaha, I mean, I am very independent but I am not a loner! The two are not equitable, and I will absolutely die on that hill XD

+1

I completely agree with you on that. 

+2 votes

Probably being called stubborn. The many times my mother accused me of that I wasn’t accepting of her abuse. In my mind I was perseverant.

I was twice told that by a supervisor who had a sex ring that I wasn’t interested in being a participant (victim) of.

Each of these times I was being perseverant and not submissive to their dominance!

by (918,020 points)
+1

Oh that's a good one. Standing your ground. For me similarly along these lines I've been told I'm "too smart for my own good", by people who were trying to take advantage of me!

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